Albert Heijn

Albert Heijn broke the rules with its ‘crystal’ glasses

The crystal glasses of Albert Heijn should not be labelled lead crystal. They don’t contain lead. The supermarket group Albert Heijn broke the advertising standards rules by suggesting shoppers could save up for the highest quality crystal glasses in its most recent advertising campaign, the Reclame Code Commissie (advertising standards body) made known.

The Dutch newspaper The Volkskrant reported in december 2014 that one consumer complained to the Reclame Code Commissie (advertising standards body) about the low quality of the glasses, saying the glasses do not contain lead and are not heavy enough to be labelled lead crystal.

This Tuesday the news website Nu.nl published that the Reclame Code Commissie just said that the supermarket group Albert Heijn broke the rules by suggesting shoppers could save up for the highest quality crystal glasses in its most recent freebie campaign, The advertising body said the supermarket group was wrong to advertise the Villeroy & Boch glasses as being crystal because they did not contain lead.

Advertising: The crystal glasses of Villeroy & Boch

The supermarket group said to Nu.nl in its defence the glasses are not such high quality as lead crystal but are made of crystalline glass. In addition, they break less easily and are dishwasher proof.

Albert Heijn is not intending to appeal against the decision of the Reclame Code Commissie. ‘Consumers can have confidence they have saved up for good quality glasses. Crystal glass is an acceptable term which is also used by other retailers,’ the supermarket group said.

Arianna
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