Kids in Haarlem

The Netherlands is one of Europe’s most kid-friendly countries, according to Lonely Planet. Haarlem, which is a rich destination for history, culture, and shopping – it’s also exciting and comfortable to explore or live in. With almost all attractions and facilities tailored to accommodate kids, Haarlem’s hospitality extends to the younger generation making it a great space to raise your kids as an expat. Packed with international schools, Dutch schools, cycling sports, shopping opportunities and other amenities, this old town which is just 15 minutes away from Amsterdam is the perfect place to grow a family.

Petting zoos and playgrounds will make kids in Haarlem lives fun

Holland is home to about 550 petting zoos, locally known as Kinderboerderij, a Dutch word that means children’s farm. Most of these zoos were started in the 1950s when urbanization kicked in with a purpose to help both adults and kids to interact with farm animals. The biggest zoo in Haarlem is Kinderboerderij Houthoeve which is located in Haarlemmerhout park. With free entrance, this zoo features a playground where kids can mingle and play a wide range of children games. Molentje in Heemstede is another popular petting zoo that neighbours the Groenendael Bos forest and one of the largest playgrounds called Speeltuin Groenendaal. Other petting zoos include Ridammerhoeve, Zorgvrij and Garden Center de Oostende. With different opening hours, your children will never lack an opportunity to interact with nature and make great playmates, something that opens and broadens their thinking.

Hospitals availability and sophisticated maternal care

There are hospitals all around such that if your child gets injured while having fun, you do not have to worry about health care. These hospitals offer the best services to babies, children, and adults. They include Spaarne Gasthuis Haarlem Zuid, Sint Lucas Andreas Ziekenhuis, Spaarne Gasthuis and Huidziekenhuis Dermicis. As a new mother living in Haarlem and Netherlands in general, you do not have to tire yourself travelling to the clinic and back. A professional maternity nurse (kraamzorg) will come to your house to look after you and your newborn. These nurses, covered by the Universal Health Insurance, will guide parents on how to care for their baby, solve any arising breastfeeding issues, and facilitate the healthy growth of the infant. Additionally, they perform light chores such as house cleaning and laundry. For these reasons, many mothers in Haarlem and beyond consider their kraamzorg godmothers to their kids.

Schools can accommodate all preferences

If you plan to settle here with your young family, there is a long list of international schools both in Haarlem and Amsterdam, but local Dutch schools are also an option. Most local schools are operated and funded by the government except some private ones. Similarly, some international schools are partly financed by the government while others are private with fees ranging between 1200-24000 euros. Here in Haarlem, you can find a school that allows you to cycle inside, save money, merge into the community and also allows your kids to learn a new language. Furthermore, before joining a regular school, children go through a Dutch immersion programme for 1 year to prepare them language-wise. Some of the schools to enroll your kids in for all levels include Coornhert Lyceum, Daaf Geluk School, Kennemer Lyceum, Sterren College, Teyler College, and Rudolf Steiner School among others.

The Netherlands produces some of the happiest children as reported by the European Union. Also, it has amenities and infrastructure that support motherhood, and that is why it was voted the 10th best country to be a parent. If you add that to the fact that Amsterdam was voted the 2nd happiest city in the world, then you can see why raising children in Haarlem, which is in very close proximity, is a great decision.

If you settle your family in Haarlem, you should establish a parenting network by reaching out to local parenting communities to discover the best experiences for your kids, thereby making it a rich experience.

Jane Sandwood

Jane Sandwood

Jane grew up in Kent and has spent most of her career working in international trade before starting a family. By wanting to spend more time with her young children she found herself moving into working from home then freelance writing. Now she's campaigning to help end isolation; especially for older adults who have lost their old support structures.
Jane Sandwood

0 replies

Leave a Reply

Want to join the discussion?
Feel free to contribute!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.