apps

The Netherlands is considered one of the most wired countries in the world, with 60% of Forbes 2000 companies boasting IT operations in Holland. Netherlands is also known as a ‘start-up capital’, owing in no small part to the keen love for the technology of its people and their renowned education system, which scores among the highest in STEM subjects. The Netherlands is also home to top app development companies, including Everdune Mobile BV, Digitalisma, and Agency No 9. These companies are making lives for the Dutch much easier, more practical, and entertaining, but if you are an expat wishing to really get to know the beauty of Holland, they can also help you feel connected and informed.

Honing your Dutch

Although you will have no trouble getting by in English, honing your Dutch skills will open the doors both to social and work opportunities. Duolingo is an excellent free app that allows you to simply type a sentence and have it corrected. The app will translate short sentences as well as larger paragraphs so if you have long sentences to correct, it will work best on a device with a large screen. Duolingo has a course called Dutch for English speakers, which will teach you the basics of grammar and pronunciation. You can also use the ‘reverse tree’ part of the app, which will allow you to translate English into Dutch.

Dutch news in English

It is vital to keep up with the news in order to be updated regarding events, laws, and regulations that could be relevant to your life in Holland. Dutch News in English will give you daily updates on the economy, elections, banking, technology, and more. The app has sections centred on top cities like Amsterdam, Rotterdam, The Hague, etc. to keep you informed on local news, but also publishes important national news.

Pyke Messenger

This hyperlocal app is specifically made for expats. It will allow you to touch base with and meet other expats and ask them for important information. Whether you need an English speaking lawyer or tax consultant, referrals will save you time and money. Networking is key when moving to a new country and this app makes it that much easier.

Buienalarm for the weather

The weather in Holland can be unpredictable. As is the case in London, showers are frequent and can appear unexpectedly. This app will let you know the probability of rain within the next two hours, which is very handy before leaving your home. A word of warning: it requires iOS 8.0 or later to work.

9292 for transport

The Netherlands has a great transport system that will get you from A to B without the need for a car and this app is super handy for when you want to get there in the least time possible. Just type in your starting point and destination. The app will provide you with all possible suggestions, letting you know how long each will take in real time.

Anne’s Amsterdam and the History of Anne Frank

Site like TripAdvisor have free apps that will propose various itineraries and inform you of top rated restaurants, but if getting to know the historical past of Amsterdam appeals, download Anne’s Amsterdam: a map containing a map of relevant information that conjures up a perfect idea of what the city was like for Anne Frank during the Second World War. The app informs you of where Anne and her friends played, grew up and went to school. It also features entertaining videos and anecdotes.

We have suggested just a few apps that can make life easier, though new ones are constantly being developed so make sure to network with other expats to be updated when new apps arise. Apps focus on leisure and culture abound, which will enable you to learn more about the Netherlands’ fascinating history and culture. Top transport apps, meanwhile, will give you a better idea of the network of transport available and help you select the best way to get to work or your next social occasion.

Do you recommend any Apps?

 

Jane Sandwood

Jane Sandwood

Jane grew up in Kent and has spent most of her career working in international trade before starting a family. By wanting to spend more time with her young children she found herself moving into working from home then freelance writing. Now she's campaigning to help end isolation; especially for older adults who have lost their old support structures.
Jane Sandwood